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Lenguas 2017

archives

 

Lenguas 2017 was a tremendous success.

Enjoy this visual summary of the conference highlights. 

Welcome Information

 

Join us for Lenguas 2017 in Mexico City, Mexico!

Lenguas 2017 is an international forum for interpreters and translators that aims to bring professionals in these two fields together under one roof to discuss best practices, learn about the situation of the market today, and receive practical training.

The Italia Morayta Foundation has invited IntepretAmerica to collaborate on the design for the program. Together, both organizations created the plenary sessions and invited the professional associations, academic institutions and individual speakers to submit proposals for the workshop sessions.

The Forum will be held from September 28-30, 2017, in Mexico City. The venue for the conference is the incomparable San Ildelfonso College

Thursday September 28 will be dedicated to plenary sessions. On Friday 29 and Saturday 30 professional development and continuing education workshops will be held. The program will include social and cultural activities to offer participants opportunities not only for relaxation but also to network and share points of view.

The Lenguas 2017 Forum will also be the venue for presenting the Italia Morayta Award in four different categories:

  • Italia Morayta Award for Conference Interpreters

  • Italia Morayta Award for Translators

  • Italia Morayta Award for Community Interpreters

  • Italia Morayta Award for Best Research Project 

Survey on Translation and Interpretation in Mexico

 

In addition, we are thrilled to announce an unprecedented initiative: Mexico’s first comprehensive, nationwide survey of interpreters and translators.

The Italia Morayta Foundation, in partnership with InterpretAmerica and the Association of Public Service and Community Interpreters and Translators, has set out to create a snapshot of the industry’s present day contours, niches, and needs.

 

Survey highlights include:

  • Conference, community, and remote interpreting

  • Literary translation to newer “niche” specialities such as transcreation and video game localization

  • Occupational health and well-being

  • Use and impact of technology

  • A first look at indigenous interpreting inside Mexico

 

The survey seeks to document the diversity and magnitude of the language services community in Mexico.

Thank you to everyone who particpated in the survey. The results have been tabulated and we will be announcing them at Lenguas 2017!

#EncuestaMexTI

Click on the image to download the survey.

 

 

 

 

 

ESTUDIO DE ENCUESTA SOBRE

LA TRADUCCIÓN Y LA INTERPRETACIÓN.

By Laura Vaughn Holcomb et al, 2017

Survey on Translation and Interpretation in Mexico

 

Mexico is made up of a rich linguistic tapestry:

  • 364 indigenous language varieties plus Spanish

  • A crossroads between its English-heavy neighbors to the north and its Spanish-laden neighbors to the south

  • A living historical bridge between pre-colombian cultures and modern diversity

 

In short, Mexico keeps its translators and interpreters busy.

But who are these language professionals? What is it exactly that they do? What are their specialties? How are they compensated for their contributions? What are the current industry norms? What is the future outlook?

In an unprecedented initiative, the Italia Morayta Foundation, in partnership with InterpretAmerica and the Association of Public Service and Community Interpreters and Translators, has set out to create a snapshot of the industry’s present day contours, niches, and needs.

The ambitious survey is designed to efficiently compile fundamental data about the field and its subspecialties. Highlights include:

  • Conference, business, and community interpreting

  • Literary translation to newer “niche” specialities such as transcreation and video game localization

  • Occupational health and well-being

  • Use and impact of technology

  • A first look at indigenous interpreting inside Mexico

 

This initiative, arising from the industry, will ultimately be returned to the industry at Lenguas 2017 in Mexico City on September 28-30, 2017, where the results will be presented and subsequently made available to all, free of charge.

Thank you to everyone who took the time to fill out the survey, which is now closed and the results are being tabulated.

We hope you will join us in September to see what the survey has revealed about our dynamic and diverse community. 

#MexTI

For more detailed information, listen to an interview with Ana Lucía Lopez in Spanish about this first-ever survey of the Mexican translation and interpretation professions and Lenguas 2017.

LENGUAS HAS BEEN APPROVED FOR CEUS FOR THE FOLLOWING:

  • CIMCE: Multiple sessions have been approved. 

  • ATA: 10 CEUs

 

Schedule At A Glance

 

Lenguas 2017 will take place between Thursday, September 28 and Saturday, September 30. 

 

Lenguas is a unique conference, blending the best of a plenary conference with a training conference. 

 

Day 1 - September 28 - will be held in full plenary session. Participants will receive up-to-date information about the current state of interpreting and translation in Mexico and how it compares to other parts of the world. Day 1 will also have interactive and entertaining networking opportunities. 

Days 2-3 - September 29-30 - provide a variety of professional training sessions to choose from that target interpreters and translators who want to improve their skills. When registration opens, you will need to choose which workshops sessions you plan on attending ahead of time. 

  • NOTE: The Plenary Sessions will be in Spanish and English with simultaneous interpreting in Spanish and English.

  • NOTE: Workshops are taught in Spanish unless otherwise noted.

 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 - PLENARY DAY

 

9:00-10:00am -       ARRIVAL AND REGISTRATION

 

10:00-10:30am -     INAUGURATION 

10:30-11:30am -     OPENING KEYNOTE: The importance of multilingualism for democratic process and for international understanding and peace -Miguel Ángel Martínez Martínez

 

11:30-12:00am -     COFFEE BREAK

 

12:00pm-1:00pm - PLENARY SESSION: Results of the White Paper on the Survey of Translation and Interpretation in Mexico 2017 - -Gonzalo Celorio-Morayta, Gibran Mena, Laura Vaughn Holcomb, Ana Lucía López Mendoza, and Alejandra Hernández León

 

1:30-2:30pm -         PLENARY PANEL: Where to Now? Nexts Steps for Language Services in Mexico - Moderator, Gonzalo Celorio-Morayta with Georganne Weller Ford, Ghislaine Margarita, Luis Raúl Fernández Acosta, Mercedes Guhl and Fidencio Briceño Chel

 

2:30-4:15pm-          LUNCH

 

4:15-4:45pm -         NETWORKING SESSION: How to Market Your Services in 60 seconds or Less - Mike Lotito (in English)

 

4:45-5:30pm -         NETWORKING

 

5:30-6:30pm -        CLOSING KEYNOTE: Humanizing Our Profession - Moderator, Katharine Allen with Doris Alfaro, Jacolyn Harmer and TBA

 

6:30-7:30pm -        AWARD CEREMONY: Italia Morayta Foundation Awards Ceremony - Sergio García Ramírez

 

7:30-8:30pm -        TOAST

 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 - TRAINING DAY

* NOTE: Some workshops are multi-session and cannot be split up. If you sign up a multi-session workshop you will be signing up for the entire workshop.

 

8:30-9:00am -        ARRIVAL AND REGISTRATION

 

9:00-11:15am -      SESSION 1

  • Indigenous Interpreting Skills (Part 1/6)* - Katharine Allen & Doris Alfaro

  • Translating Books for Children and Youth: A Creative Act? -Mercedes Guhl

  • Consecutive Interpretation Skills Enhancement Workshop, (Part 1/6)* - Jacolyn Harmer (in English)

  • Legal Interpreting Outside the Courtroom in the U.S. and Mexico - Esther M. Navarro-Hall & María Inés Ojeda Pesquera

  • Feedback and English Retour Lab for Interpreters - Liz Essary & Laura Vaughn-Holcomb (in English)

  • Networking Is Easy! - Mike Lotito (in English)

 

11:15-11:45am -    COFFEE BREAK

 

11:45am -2:00pm - SESSION 2

  • Indigenous Interpreting Skills (Part 2/6)* - Katharine Allen & Doris Alfaro

  • Literary Translation Using "El Espía" as a Guide - María del Pilar Ortiz Lovillo

  • Consecutive Interpretation Skills Enhancement Workshop, (Part 2/6)* - Jacolyn Harmer (in English)

  • How to Prepare for the ATA Certification Exam, (Part 1/2)* -Mariana de la Vega & Rudolf Heller

  • Characteristics of Mexican Sign Language Interpretation -Asociación de Intérpretes de Lengua de Señas del Distrito Federal

  • Online Promotion: A Balance Between Creativity and Discipline - Catherine Pizani

 

2:00-4:00pm -       LUNCH

 

4:00-6:15pm -       SESSION 3 

  • Indigenous Interpreting Skills (Part 3/6)* - Katharine Allen & Doris Alfaro

  • Beginning Subtitling - Angélica Ramirez

  • Consecutive Interpretation Skills Enhancement Workshop,(Part 3/6)* - Jacolyn Harmer (in English)

  • How to Prepare for the ATA Certification Exam, (Part 2/2)* - Mariana de la Vega & Rudolf Heller

  • The Psychological Impact of Interpreting - Ana Morales Marín

  • The Digital Interpreter™: Tablets and Pens - Esther M. Navarro-Hall

 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 - TRAINING DAY

* NOTE: Some workshops are multi-session and cannot be split up. If you sign up a multi-session workshop you will be signing up for the entire workshop.

 

8:30-9:00am -      ARRIVAL AND REGISTRATION

 

9:00-11:15am -    SESSION 4

  • Indigenous Interpreting Skills (Part 4/6)*- Katharine Allen & Doris Alfaro

  • About Translation Commentary - Arturo Vázquez Barrón

  • Consecutive Interpretation Skills Enhancement Workshop,(Part 4/6)* - Jacolyn Harmer (in English)

  • Introduction to Web Site and Wep Page Localization, (Part 1/2)* - Luis Raúl Fernández Acosta

  • How to Prepare Terminology for a Simultaneous Interpreting Event, (Part 1/2)* - Darinka Mangino

  • Remote Interpreting Platforms - Barry S. Olsen

 

11:15-11:45am - COFFEE BREAK

 

11:45am -2:00pm -SESSION 5

  • Indigenous Interpreting Skills (Part 5/6)*- Katharine Allen & Doris Alfaro

  • Introduction to Theatre Texts Translation - Humberto Pérez Mortera

  • Consecutive Interpretation Skills Enhancement Workshop,(Part 5/6)* - Jacolyn Harmer (in English)

  • Introduction to Web Site and Wep Page Localization, (Part 2/2)* - Luis Raúl Fernández Acosta

  • How to Prepare Terminology for a Simultaneous Interpreting Event, (Part 2/2)* - Darinka Mangino

  • Copyright- What interpreters and translators need to know - Christian Thomae

 

2:00-4:00pm -        LUNCH

 

4:00-6:15pm -       SESSION 6

  • Indigenous Interpreting Skills (Part 6/6)* - Katharine Allen & Doris Alfaro

  • Translating Marketing Material: 5 Ways To Help You Get It Right - Erika Maria Eyl Newell

  • Consecutive Interpretation Skills Enhancement Workshop,(Part 6/6)* - Jacolyn Harmer (in English)

  • Translating for an International Organization -Virginia Aguirre Muñoz

  • Preparing for an International Organization's Interpreter Examination - Salomé Abud

  • AXOLOTL: The Náhuatl Translation System - Ximena Gutiérrez Vasques

Program Sessions 

 

LENGUAS HAS BEEN APPROVED FOR CEUS FOR THE FOLLOWING:

  • CIMCE: Multiple sessions have been approved. Click HERE for the complete list. 

  • ATA: 10 CEUs

 

Program Overview

Lenguas is a unique conference, blending the best of a plenary conference with a training conference. 

Day 1 - September 28 - will be held in full plenary session. Participants will receive up-to-date information about the current state of interpreting and translation in Mexico and how it compares to other parts of the world. Day 1 will also have interactive and entertaining networking opportunities. 

Days 2-3 - September 29-30 - provide a variety of professional training sessions to choose from that target interpreters and translators who want to improve their skills. When registration opens, you will need to choose which workshops sessions you plan on attending ahead of time. 

♦ NOTE: The Plenary Sessions will be in Spanish and English with simultaneous interpreting in Spanish and English.

♦ NOTE: Workshops are taught in Spanish unless otherwise noted.

Thursday, September 28

INAUGURATION - Gonzalo Celorio-Morayta, Katharine Allen and Barry S. Olsen

Join us as we formally open the inaugural Lenguas conference. Gonzalo Celorio-Morayta from the Italia Morayta Foundation and Barry S. Olsen and Katharine Allen from InterpretAmerica will welcome participants and provide framework remarks about the conference.

OPENING KEYNOTE: THE IMPORTANCE OF MULTILINGUALISM FOR DEMOCRATIC PROGRESS AND FOR INTERNATIONAL UNDERSTANDING AND PEACE - Miguel Angel Martínez y Martínez

Europe has embraced and institutionalized the importance of multilingualism with the founding of the European Union. The EU's structure prioritizes the right of countries and cultures to preserve and maintain their native languages in political, ecomonic and social arenas. Mexico also has a history of multilingualism, balancing a mix of European and indigenous languages, sometimes in harmony, more often in conflict. Currently, Mexico has national laws on the books that support the preservation and celebration of indigenous languages that are often in conflict with the daily prejudice and discrimination many indigenous people's face for speaking their native langauges. In this session, a celebrated member of the European Parliarment highlights the lessons learned from over 50 years of European multilingualism and what they mean for Mexico's.

PLENARY SESSION: SUMMARY RESULTS ON THE WHITE PAPER ON THE SURVEY OF TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETATION IN MEXICO 2017 - Gonzalo Celorio-Morayta, Gibran Mena, Laura Vaughn-Holcomb, Ana Lucía López Mendoza, and Alejandra Hernández León

Over the course of 2017, Lenguas organizers spearheaded a national survey on the state of the translation and interpretation in Mexico. The first such research of its kind, this survey covers all areas of language services, including community settings where indigenous interpreters work. This presentation distills the key survey results to paint a picture of the landscape interpreters and translators work in, how much they earn, where they work, who they work for, and what the biggest challenges to the profession are. Lenguas participants will be the first to receive this cutting-edge information. 

PLENARY PANEL: WHERE TO NOW? NEXT STEPS FOR LANGUAGE SERVICES IN MEXICO - Moderator: Gonzalo Celorio-Morayta with Georganne Weller Ford, Ghislaine Margarita, Luis Raúl Fernández Acosta, Mercedes Guhl, and Fidencio Briceño Chel

This panel session explores the implications posed to the translation and interpreting profession in Mexico by the results of the White Paper. Panel members who are leaders in translation and interpretation academic programs, practitioners and companies will help the audience make sense of current trends and urgent problems facing the profession. They will outline recommended next steps the profession can take to strengthen the profession during this time of profound disruption. 

NETWORKING SESSION: HOW TO MARKET YOUR SERVICES IN 60 SECONDS OR LESS - Mike Lotito

Note: workshop in English

Interpreting and translation are professions dominated by independent contractors. Practitioners and companies have to market their services to obtain work. Often, the first impression is the most important impression you can make and can determine whether you are hired or ignored. Making yourself visible in this all-information-all-the-time world of social media can be hard. You need a quick, effective "speech" that describes the services you offer and why they are worth purchasing. This presentation helps participants create a 60-seconds or less introduction to the services they provide so you don't miss out on work opportunities again.

CLOSING KEYNOTE: HUMANIZING OUR PROFESSION - Moderator, InterpretAmerica

For the closing keynote, we bring you a unique conversation with interpreters and translators working in non-traditional settings. Check back soon for a full description of speakers and topics for this session. 

AWARDS CEREMONY: ITALIA MORAYTA FOUNDATION AWARD CEREMONY - Sergio García Ramírez

We are excited to host the prestigious 2017 Italia Morayta Foundation Awards at Lenguas 2017 in the following categories: 

• Italia Morayta Award for Conference Interpreters
• Italia Morayta Award for Translators
• Italia Morayta Award for Community Interpreters
• Italia Morayta Award for Best Research Project

Join us as we celebrate our peers in the work they are doing to improve our profession.

Friday, September 29

INDIGENOUS INTERPRETING SKILLS TRAINING, PARTS 1-3 - Katharine Allen and Doris Alfaro

This is a 14-hour workshop for indigenous interpreters. The training, offered in collaboration with La Asociación Intérpretes y Traductores en Servicios Públicos y Comunitarios, uses materials adapted from The Indigenous Interpreter™ training program, a 60-hour curriculum. This workshop will focus on core interpreting skills, such as consecutive, strategies for sight translation and simultaneous interpreting. Each topic includes targeted guidance for overcoming the barriers indigenous interpreters encounter daily when interacting with providers and clients in many different service settings.

TRANSLATING BOOKS FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH: A CREATIVE ACT? - Mercedes Guhl

The translator's goal is to stay faithful to the original text. When it comes to translating children's and teen books, it's easy to assume that staying faithful to the text is child's play. Editors and translators often view it as work that requires less experience and effort than other kinds of translation. However, for children's and teen books, the concept of fidelity clamors for a more flexible definition. Children, as beginning readers, are ruthless when it comes to flaws in the translation that might impede understanding. Through the use of examples, this workshop explores various strategies that use "controlled creativity" to create translated texts that both entertain and inform the public, while also promoting reading. 

CONSECUTIVE INTERPRETATION SKILLS ENHANCEMENT WORKSHOP, PART 1 - Jacolyn Harmer

This limited access, hands-on consecutive interpretation skills enhancement workshop, offered in a supportive, small group environment, is intended for practicing interpreters – with or without formal training – wanting to sharpen their consecutive interpretation expertise.

The workshop will be delivered in English over two days with 3 sessions each day. Given the progressive design of the workshop activities, participants must commit to attending each session.

Interpreters with any working language combination – which must include English – are welcome. If in addition to English your language combination does not include Spanish, (e.g. English + Portuguese), try to partner with a colleague sharing the same language combination. (Exception made for English + French / German.)

Participants will review the consecutive interpreting process, practicing, integrating and fine-tuning the core skills as well as specific variations required by different norms.  Particular attention will be paid to memory, note-taking, public speaking and problem-solving strategies.

The workshop instructor will offer feedback and moderate peer observations.

LEGAL INTERPRETING OUTSIDE THE COURTROOM IN THE U.S. AND MEXICO - Esther M Navarro Hall & María Inés Ojeda Pesquera

After a brief presentation by both instructors, participants will be divided into small groups to practice sight translation and consecutive interpretation. Objectives: 1. To practice sight translation with EN>ES and ES>EN texts and receive instructors’ feedback 2. To compare the initial stages of the judicial process in the U.S. and Mexico and review terminology briefly 3. To describe depositions and specific requirements for the interpreter in this setting 4. To practice short consecutive with EN<>ES dialogues and receive instructors’ feedback.

FEEDBACK AND ENGLISH RETOUR LAB FOR INTERPRETERS - Liz Essary & Laura Vaughn-Holcomb

Note: workshop in English

As interpreters we often work in a vacuum: there is no one to help us with our blind spots or affirm we are on the right track. The chance to receive feedback is golden, but not all feedback is created equal—haphazard comments may not be useful, or, at worst, do harm. Giving thoughtful, well-delivered feedback can be equally edifying, a chance to build intimacy and crystallize our own conceptions of quality. In this lab within a lab, we will cover peer-to-peer and trainer-to-student feedback and then put it all to the test in a hands-on “Working into English B” workshop.

NETWORKING IS EASY! - Mike Lotito

Note: workshop in English

Successful American businessman, Mike Lotito, will share four steps to effective networking.  The workshop will include creating a personal narrative, practicing delivery and forming professional connections that can help you build your business and create friendships.

LITERARY TRANSLATION USING “EL ESPIA” AS A GUIDE - María del Pilar Ortiz Lovillo

Participants will experience and practice translation using the computer program "El Espía." Difficulties encountered when translating a children's story will be highlighted. During the first part of the workshop, participants will translate a classic tale, Le Petit Chaperon Rouge. Then participants will translate several short texts that provide practice handling these difficulties. 

HOW TO PREPARE FOR THE ATA CERTIFICATION EXAM, PARTS 1-2 - Mariana de la Vega & Rudolf Heller

Join seasoned translators from the ATA as they guide you through the steps for preparing for the ATA certification exam. 

THE CHARACTERISTICS OF SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETING - Asociación de Intérpretes de Lengua de Señas del Distrito Federal

This workshop both addresses and demonstrates the differences between oral language interpreters and sign language interpreters. It also highlights different work settings and provides examples of various scenarios that sign language interpreters commonly face.

ONLINE MARKETING: A BALANCE BETWEEN CREATIVITY AND DISCIPLINE - Catherine Pizani

Promoting your services as a freelance translator takes discipline, creativity and confidence in yourself. "Small is beautiful!" Our small-scale businesses don't need multinational marketing to develop. Rather, we need a step-by-step process of small actions we can take every week throughout the year. In this era of instant facts and information overload, we need to reconnect with our colleagues to generate professional connections that are efficient. We need to focus on our larger market without losing ourselves in the Internet. 

What do I want to do on Twitter? How can I connect with colleagues who work in the same field on LinkedIn? How can I use my own writing to attract new clients? How can I find better-paying clients? Why is it important to change the word "expenses" to "mid- to long-term investment" when the time comes to invest in marketing tools? The clearer our marketing is the less tedious it is for us. Why is it important to be creative when we set up our own marketing? 

This workshop is for freelance translators who want to learn how to position themselves in a specific market. It will help you better understand social media and digital marketing. This workshop is for beginners as well as experienced professionals. 

BEGINNING SUBTITLING - Angélica Ramírez

This workshop will introduce participants to basic concepts when translating subtitles. Participants will learn how to use free specialized software to create subtitles. 

THE PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF INTERPRETING - Ana Morales Marín

This workshop explores the different kinds of situations that interpreters face and the kinds of stress and psychological impact they can have. Solutions and targeted information for how interpreters can address these problems will be offered. 

THE DIGITAL INTERPRETER: TABLETS AND PENS (TM) - Esther M. Navarro-Hall

Digital technologies offer interpreters a wealth of options for improving skills and performance, ranging from apps for smartphones and tablets to smart pens for hybrid simultaneous-consecutive interpreting (Sim-Consec™). This session will introduce you to these technological wonders and discuss their practical implications for interpreters and their varied working environments, such as conference, court, medical and community settings. Whether you are barely getting started with some of these devices, or have been using them for a while, you will come away with some fresh ideas on how to make the best use of these technologies.

Saturday, September 30

INDIGENOUS INTERPRETING SKILLS TRAINING, PARTS 4-6 - Katharine Allen and Doris Alfaro

This is the continuation of the 14-hour workshop for indigenous interpreters. The training, offered in collaboration with La Asociación Intérpretes y Traductores en Servicios Públicos y Comunitarios, uses materials adapted from The Indigenous Interpreter™ training program, a 60-hour curriculum. This workshop will focus on core interpreting skills, such as consecutive, strategies for sight translation and simultaneous interpreting. Each topic includes targeted guidance for overcoming the barriers indigenous interpreters encounter daily when interacting with providers and clients in many different service settings.

ABOUT TRANSLATION COMMENTARY - Arturo Vázquez Barrón

The practice of translation commentary is essential for the professional translator, especially when you need to explain, justify and provide a foundation to editors and proofreaders about your solution for a translation problem in the original text. This workshop will briefly present what translation commentary is and the best way to draft it. 

  1. What is the objective for the translation commentary? Who is it for? 

  2. Examples of translation commentary.

  3. Identifying the translation problem. 

  4. Identifying the type of translation problem. 

  5. Basic characterisics of translation commentary

CONSECUTIVE INTERPRETATION SKILLS ENHANCEMENT WORKSHOP, PART 2 - Jacolyn Harmer

This limited access, hands-on consecutive interpretation skills enhancement workshop, offered in a supportive, small group environment, is intended for practicing interpreters – with or without formal training – wanting to sharpen their consecutive interpretation expertise.

The workshop will be delivered in English over two days with 3 sessions each day. Given the progressive design of the workshop activities, participants must commit to attending each session.

Interpreters with any working language combination – which must include English – are welcome. If in addition to English your language combination does not include Spanish, (e.g. English + Portuguese), try to partner with a colleague sharing the same language combination. (Exception made for English + French / German.)

Participants will review the consecutive interpreting process, practicing, integrating and fine-tuning the core skills as well as specific variations required by different norms.  Particular attention will be paid to memory, note-taking, public speaking and problem-solving strategies.

The workshop instructor will offer feedback and moderate peer observations.

INTRODUCTION TO WEBSITE AND WEB PAGE LOCALIZATION, PARTS 1-2 - Luis Raúl Fernández Acosta

This workshop is divided into two session blocks and provides a general overview of localization around the world (definition, characteristics, types, profile of the current localization specialist, tools of localization and industry, associations, etc.).  

The first block focuses on web page localization (HTML, tools for working with the source code and localization of a web page in English or French to Spanish). 

The second block covers the characteristics of web sites, using a tool that copies web sites. We will localize some of the directory files for the web site, using a localization tool. 

HOW TO PREPARE TERMINOLOGY FOR SIMULTANEOUS INTERPRETING EVENTS, PARTS 1-2 - Darinka Mangino

This a two-part session. There is a general understanding among practitioners that preparing for an interpreting assignment is related to higher quality and job satisfaction. The amount of conference material and time available is a key factor affecting the preparation process. Preparing for some assignments could be described as a paradox. Interpreters might be given all the material needed for thorough preparation, though they might receive it very close to the time of the conference. In other cases, interpreters are given sufficient time to prepare but receive very few details on their assignment.

The primary objective of this one-day practical course is to provide interpreters with a preparation method and tools allowing them to most effectively use their time and the materials available when preparing for a conference assignment. The secondary objective is to explore the possibility of implementing a method that anticipates the main components of the communicative event.

REMOTE INTERPRETING PLATFORMS – Barry S. Olsen

Remote interpreting platforms have matured. There are now many platforms on the market that can provide interpreters and clients with platforms that allow them to communicate smoothly and without interruption. Join interpreting tech expert Barry S. Olsen as he demonstrates several remote interpreting platforms and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of each one.

INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE TEXTS TRANSLATION - Humberto Pérez Mortera

TBA

COPYRIGHT- WHAT INTERPRETERS AND TRANSLATORS NEED TO KNOW - Christian Thomae

Translators work with copyrighted materials all the time. They also create copyrighted materials when they translate. This session will walk you through what you need to know as a translator about copyright protections. 

TRANSLATING MARKETING MATERIAL: 5 WAYS TO HELP YOU GET IR RIGHT - Erika Maria Eyl Newell

As is the case with any area of specialized translation, when the time comes to translate creative content for use in advertising, public relations, and marketing in general, there's a catch. Join us for a workshop that will provide you with practical tips to work with this type of material. We will touch on the importance of audiences, copywriting, creative content creation, and naturally, we will cover 'transcreation' and its evolution into a more generally accepted field within our business. 

TRANSLATING FOR INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS - Virginia Aguirre Muñoz

What does it mean to translate for international organizations? How can you get work for these institutions? What kind of professional profile do you need as a translator? This workshop offers a general overview of translation for international organizations, along with related professional requirements. The importance of editing, specialization and continuing professional development will be explored. Participants will work on short translation texts from English to Spanish.

PREPARING FOR AN INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION'S INTERPRETER EXAMINATION - Salomé Abud

This workshop focuses on interpretation in the booth at the United Nations. I will explain how the competitive exam process is organized and what is expected of the interpreters who take the exams. This is a practice-based workshop using speeches from past exams. We will analyze the common types of errors made. This workshop will help interpreters learn how to better prepare for these exams. 

AXOLOTL: THE NAHUATL TRANSLATION SYSTEM - Ximena Gutiérrez Vasques

The Spanish-Náhuatl Axolotl parallel corpus gathers various sources with parallel content in both languages. 

A parallel corpus is created by using texts in a source language with translations into one or more target languages, so that every text has a corresponding translation. Parallel corpuses are a source of translation memory that can support humans in their work to find appropriate translations embedded in context.  

This workshop will present a Spanish-Náhuatl Axolotl parallel corpus and explore how it can facilitate translation tasks between these two languages.                                             

 
 

Lenguas 2017 Presenters

 

Alejandra Hernández León

Alejandra Hernández León has a degree in Sociology from the National Autonomous University at Azcapotzalco and has worked as a public servant in several Mexico City government institutions, including the defunct Directorate of Indigenous Peoples, the Secretariat for Development and Social Equality for indigenous communities and in programs supporting indigenous communities run by the Secretariat of Government. Alejandra also worked in the Directorate of Linguistic Policy at INALI as a liaison between researchers at the National Project on the Ethnography of Mexico's Indigenous Regions and INAH's National Coordination of Anthropology. Her academic work has focused on public policy, the immgration of indigenous peoples to cities and the the evolution of their communities and identities in urban areas. Currently, she is a member of the Board of Directors for the Association of Public Service Interpreters and Translators. 

Ana Lucía López Mendoza

Ana Lucía López Mendoza is an interpreter with a degree from the Instituto Superior de Intérpretes y Traductores. She was selected to participate in the Mock Congress for Beginning Interpreters in 2014 and  has an advanced certificate in Diplomatic Studies. Her academic and professional training has led her to focus on promoting linguistic rights for immigrants who are non Spanish-speaking refugee and asylum applicants and for whom she is an active advocate for communication as an essential right. Currently, she work as a research assistant for the Italia Morayta Foundation and helped prepare the 2017 Survey on Translation and Interpretation in Mexico. 

Ana Morales Marín

Ana is a resident of Madrid, Spain. She graduated from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in Translation and Interpretation in English, French and Spanish. She specializes in Medical and Legal translation FR-ES/ES-FR after studying in the posgraduate program in Intercultural Communication, Interpretation and Translation in Public Service Interpreting from the Universidad of Alcalá de Henares de Madrid in 2014-2015. Her thesis was titled "The psychological impact on the Interpreter," which is the topic of her session at Lenguas 2017.

 

Arturo Vázquez Barrón

Arturo is a literary translator who graduated from El Colegio de México. He is a professor of literary translation at IFAL and a coordinated IFAL's Literary and Humanistic Translation degree program from 1986 to 2016. She is a founding member of the Mexican Association for Literary Translators. 

 

Asociacion de Intérpretes de Lengua de Señas Del D. F.

Mexico City's Association of Sign Language Interpreters (AILSDF) was legally constituted on October 3th 2007 and from that date we started providing professional services complying with the Professional Conduct Code and respecting the Deaf Community. It is a non-for-profit Association looking to dignify the interpretation profession and role of conference interpreters through social interactions with the Deaf Community and the hearing community under the same opportunities. That is why we offer proffesional interpretation, translation and survey services, while raising awareness and respecting the interpreter's role.

 

Barry Slaughter Olsen

Barry Slaughter Olsen is a veteran conference interpreter and technophile with over two decades of experience interpreting, training interpreters and organizing language services. He is an associate professor at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS), the founder and co-president of InterpretAmerica, and General Manager of Multilingual Operations at ZipDX. He is a member of the International Association of Conference Interpreters (AIIC). For updates on interpreting, technology and training, follow him on Twitter @ProfessorOlsen.

Catherine Pizani

Catherine Pizani has managed an office of translation since 2007. She translates from Spanish and English into French. She has a degree in Languages of International Commerce and a Masters in International Business Negotiation. In the late 1990s she received training in journalism. In 2011 she was trained in translation. She works for nonprofit organizations, foundations, international agencies (PNUD, PNUE, UNOPS, etc.), think tanks and the Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores de Antropología Social (CIESAS). She manages a team of translators who work in other language pairs. She specializes in international cooperation, the environment and gender issues. She also supports Mexican smalled and medium-sized businesses to develop internationa communication. Her website is: http://lebureaudelatraductrice.com/

Christian Thomae

Christian Thomae joined Dumont Bergman Bider & Co., in 2016. He is an Attorney at Law and began his specialization in Intellectual Property in 1998. Christian has a focus on trademarks, but also has expertise in patent, copyright and other fields of IP law. He has assisted clients with the protection of their rights globally, developing protection strategies according to the needs of each client so as to achieve their secure entry into new markets. He also has extensive experience in e-commerce, domain names, UDRP and LDRP proceedings and matters related to the protection of IP rights on the Internet. Christian is a member of the Mexican Association for the Protection of Intellectual Property (AMPPI), the Interamerican Association of Intellectual Property (ASIPI), the International Trademark Association (INTA) and the European Communities Trade Mark Association (ECTA). He has been invited to speak at different Intellectual Property conferences and is a member of the Faculty for the WIPO SUMMER SCHOOL ON INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY IN MEXICO since 2008. Currently he is a member of the Education Commission of AMPPI, member of the Social Media and Mobile Application Subcommittee of the Internet Committee of INTA, and a member of the Technology Committee of ASIPI.

Darinka Mangino

Darinka Mangino is an Adjunct Professor of Interpreting and Legal Interpreting at Anahuac University. She received her Bachelor’s in Interpreting from Instituto Superior de Interpretes y Traductores in 2000 and her PGC in Forensic Linguistics from Aston University in 2012. She became a member of Colegio Mexicano de Interpretes de Conferencias (CMIC) in 2007 and of the International Association of Conference Interpreters (AIIC) in 2013 and was appointed Public Relations Representative for the Mexico, Guatemala & Caribbean Region in 2016. She is a certified Court Interpreter for Mexico City and in 2011 became part of the pool of interpreters hired by the Mexican Office of the President.

 

Erika Eyl Newell

With more than 20 years experience in communications, Erika has forged a carrera in public relations and more recently as a translator and specialist in various content areas for marketing. In Mexico, she worked with prominent multinational consultants in the industry; first with Burson Marsteller Mexico and later, for nine years with Fleishman Hillard at their Mexico City and Miami offices. As a PR and communications consultant, Erika has broad experience in a variety of sectors, from technology, health care and lifestyle to tourism and corporate communication. More recently, she has worked with targeted the diverse translation needs in marketing. She works primarily with corporate communication teams for different companies, as well as for PR agencies. A Honduran native, with professional and academic experience in Mexico and the United States, Erika is a graduate of the Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas and has an MBA from Thunderbird, The American Graduate School of International Business in Glendale, Arizona. She received a diploma of translation from the Iberoamerican University. Aside from her work as a translator, Erika is in charge of marketing and communications for Brand Finance Mexico, a consultancy firm that specializes in brand strategy and valuation. 

Esther M. Navarro-Hall

Esther M. Navarro-Hall is the owner of 1Culture (www.1culture.net), a company specializing in interpreting, training and consulting. She is an Adjunct Professor at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS), where she teaches Community, Court and Conference Interpreting. She holds an M.A. in Conference Interpretation (MIIS) and has worked as a freelance interpreter for 32 years.

Esther Navarro-Hall

Esther Navarro-Hall has provided training for interpreters and interpreter trainers in the U.S. and abroad. She is a pioneer in interpreting technologies, online training, and training for speakers of indigenous languages. She is also the creator of the Sim-Consec™ method (a hybrid of two interpreting skills plus various digital technologies), and has taught it to hundreds of interpreters around the world. She is a federally certified court interpreter and a state certified court and medical interpreter (CA). In addition, she has interpreted for the U.S. State Department and is a certified ATA translator (EN>ES).

Professor Navarro-Hall is the immediate past Chair of the National Association of Judiciary Interpreters & Translators (NAJIT) and is currently a Member of the Board of Directors.

 

Fidencio Briceño Chel 

Fidencio is a native speaker of Maya and has a degree in Anthropological Sciences specializing in Language and Literature from the Autonomous University of the Yucatán. He also has completed doctoral studies in Anthropological Linguistics from the National Autonomous University of Mexico. 

 

Fidencio is the author of articles and books about the teaching and dissemination of Mayan language and culture. He has consulted and collaborated with non-profits and civial associations to promote, disseminate and study the Maya language and customs. Fidencio has taught the Mayan language nationally and internationally and he has worked as a Mayan language translator. His outstanding translations include: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights; the General Act on the Linguistic Rights of Indigenous Peoples; the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; and the 2010 and updated 2015 Political Constitution of the United Mexican States, to name a few. 

 

Fidencio has been the recipient of national awards such as the Wigberto Jiménez Moreno National Award from CONACULTA and INAH in 1998, the National Award for Journalism and Information for his editorial and journalistic collaboration on the cultural radio program Friends, Books, Arte and Traditions (IMER) in 2001 and the Yuri Knorosov Medal in 2016 at the International Festival of Mayan Culture. 

Fidencio has also held Federal-level positions such as the Director of Research at INALi in 2006 and Coordinator for the Catalog of Indigenous Languages of Mexico in the Yucatan Peninsula published by INALI in 2014. In 2012-2013 he coordinated the Mayan translation of the Póopol Wuuj, published in 2013 in a double Spanish-Yucatan Mayan edition in Venezuela and Mexico. 

For more than 30 years, Fidencio Briceño has documented the oral Mayan tradition with Mayan speakers and specialists of the Yucatan Peninsula. Currently, he is a research professor at the INAH Yucatan Center and coordinator of its Linguistics Department, where he is in charge of various projects. 

 

Ghislaine Margarita

Ghislaine has worked as an English-Spanish interpreter for more than 10 years. She graduated with a degree in interpretation from the Instituto Superior de Intérpretes y Traductores (ISIT) in Mexico in 2006 and obtained an advanced certificate in Diplomatic Studies from the same institution in 2008. She has been a Professor of Interpretation at ISIT since 2010. She is passionate about teaching and helping train future interpreters, which keeps her up-to-date with the latest advancements and research in the interpreting profession. She is co-founder and member of the Organizing Committee for the Mock Congress for Beginning Interpreters which has taken place annually in Mexico City since 2013. 

 

Ghislaine worked as a television interpreter during the US presidential debates in 2016 for Televisión Azteca (Canal 40, Azteca América). She has worked for several UN organizations, such as UN Women, UNESCO, ECLAC, UNDP, UNICEF and the Security Council, as well non-governmental organizations such as Greenpeace, Amnesty International and Oxfam. Her work also includes various federal entities, academic institutions and private sector companies. She is a pre-candidate for membership in the International Association of Conference Interpreters (AIIC).

 

Gibran Mena

Gibrán Mena became a journalist through data analysis and visualization. In addition, he is a member of groups and organizations that promote the use of technology for social autonomy. He works with data to make conflicts and social needs more visible. Gibrán is editor for the spanish website of the International School of Data. You can find his work at: marcosge.agency y escueladedatos.org.

 

Gonzalo Celorio Morayta

While languages are at the core of his professional career, Gonzalo Celorio Morayta has also been closely involved with education, culture, event organization, and administration. He is a member of the Mexican College of Conference Interpreters, for which he has been entrusted with management responsibilities on the Executive Committee over five administrative terms. Currently, Gonzalo is a member of the Admissions Committee. As a translator, he has published with Simon and Schuster—Aguilar, the Fondo de Cultura Económica and El Colegio de Mexico, among others. His textbooks have been published by Richmond Publishing, Santillana, the University of Dayton, and Grupo SM. In addition, Gonzalo has run CM Idiomas for more than 20 years, a company which evolved from the first association of translators and interpreters in Latin America. Under his leadership, CM Idiomas has become one of the primary providers of language services in the region. Since 2016 he has been Chair of the Executive Committee of the Italia Morayta Foundation, during which time he has coordinated and moderated two online seminar series: From Translators for Translators, organized jointly with the UNAM’s Foreign Languages Center (CELE); and A Bridge between Generations, organized jointly with the Mexican College of Conference Interpreters and the International Association of Conference Interpreters (AIIC). Gonzalo has also convened professional associations, academic institutions and language services providers to carry out joint projects that seek to give visibility to translation and interpretation professionals and offer them options for continuing education.

 

Humberto Pérez Mortera

Humberto has experience as a translator, instructor and writer of theatre works for children. His translations include Scorched by Wajdi Mouawad, Joining Cultures by Luc Tartar, Love's End by Pascal Rambert and A Moon for the Misbegotten by Eugene O'Neil. 

 

Jacolyn Harmer

Jacolyn Harmer was born and educated in the UK. After earning her BA in French/German at the University of Bradford, she trained as an English Booth conference interpreter with the Commission of the European Communities (now European Union) and began her career based in Brussels, working as a staff interpreter for the EU institutions and later as a freelancer for international institutions and the private market. In 1985 she joined the Monterey Institute of International Studies Graduate School of Translation & Interpretation (now MIIS / GSTILE) faculty as a full-time professor of translation and interpretation, while continuing to freelance interpret and translate, with an English/French/German/Spanish working combination. Her clients have ranged from heads-of-state-&-government, to medical missions in the global south. She earned an MA in Hispanic Studies and a TESOL Certificate from MIIS. A long-standing member of the International Association of Conference Interpreters (AIIC), she served for several years on the AIIC Training Committee. She was awarded the Diplôme d’Études Approfondies (Master of Advanced Studies) in interpreter education from the University of Geneva School of Translation and Interpretation and subsequently joined the teaching team, co-delivering the Training of Interpreter Trainers program for over 10 years. She has since designed and contributed to Interpreter Trainer programs/workshops worldwide. Her translation of Pédagogie Raisonnée de l'Interprétation (Seleskovitch & Lederer) was published in 1996.

 

Katharine Allen

Katharine Allen is a healthcare and community interpreter with over 3 decades of experience interpreting, training, and designing curricula. She is co-president of InterpretAmerica, which organizes conferences and events to raise the profile of the interpreting profession nationally and internationally. As an interpreter trainer, she is lead developer and licensed trainer for The Indigenous Interpreter℠ 60-hour training and has helped embed professional interpreting into medical missions in Mexico. She teaches for the Glendon College Masters in Conference Interpreting and The Professional Interpreter Online. Katharine is co-author of The Community Interpreter® International: An International Textbook and The Medical Interpreter: A Foundation Textbook for Medical Interpreting. Katharine has an MA in Translation and Interpretation in English/Spanish from the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey.

 

Laura Holcomb

Healthcare interpreter by heart and conference interpreter by hat, Laura Vaughn Holcomb has been the conveyor of intimacies between embattled cancer patients and oncologists, between midwives and new mothers for nearly a decade. Conference interpreter trainer, training technology consultant, and English retour language coach, Laura herself holds a Master of Conference Interpreting from Glendon College. In 2017, Laura led Mexico’s first nationwide survey of T&I professionals on behalf of the Italia Morayta Foundation and InterpretAmerica. Adjunct professor at Glendon College, she co-developed the novel Virtual Healthcare Interpreting Practicum and launched CoLAB Toronto, an affordable, peer practice intensive. LauraHolcomb.com

 

Liz Essary

Liz Essary is a medial, court, and conference interpreter and is a state certified court interpreter, and national certified healthcare interpreter in the US. She is an interpreter trainer and holds a Masters of Conference Interpreting from Glendon College. Between 2011 and 2015, in her role as Language Services Supervisor at Indiana University Health, she conducted English and Spanish language evaluations for bilingual staff and interpreters. She is adjunct faculty at Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis.

 

Luis Raúl Fernandez Acosta

Luis Raúl holds a Masters Degree in Translation and New Technologies: Software Translation and Multimedia Products EN/FR>SP from the International University of Menendez Pelayo, Madrid, Spain and in Didactics of French as a Foreign Language from Caen University, France. He studied Teaching of Foreign Languages at Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (BUAP) and is alumni of the Translators Training Program from the Colegio de México. He is a certified translator FR<>SP for the Judiciary Federal Council, for the Supreme Court of Justice of Mexico City and by the Canadian Embassy in Mexico. As a professional translator and locator, Luis Raúl collaborates with several Mexican and foreign agencies.

 

Manés Ojeda

Manés is a Translator/Interpreter with a degree from the Instituto Superior de Intérpretes y Traductores. She has a degree in Legal Translation from the Center of Applied Lingustic Studies and is Trados Master from SIC, Barcelona. She teaches translation for various degree and Masters programs in universities in Mexico City (Ibero, ColMex, Anáhuac). 

 

María Angélica Ramiréz Gutiérrez

María Angélica studied Modern English Langauge and Literature at Mexico's National Autonomous University, the Program for Translator Traning at El Colegio de Mexico and a PhD in Translation from the Universidad de Alicante in Spain. She has focused on audiovisual translation for the past 15 years, translating movies, TV series and documentaries forCanal 11, Televisión Metropolitana Canal 22 and various cable TV channels. Currently, María Angélica subtitles educational videos disseminated on the Internet and scientific videos for public and private universities. She is cofounder of the first degree in Audiovisual Translation in Mexico and is a professor of Translation and Interpretation at the Universidad Anáhuac México.

 

María del Pilar Ortiz Lovillo

María is a translator of French literature, as well as scientific books and articles. She has translated Marcel Proust, Gustave Flaubert, Georges Perec, The Marqués de Sade, Jean Delumeau and Marcel Aymé. She has a PhD in Language Sciences from the Universidad Veracruzana and a graduate from the Program of Translator Training at El Colegio de México. Over the past three decades, she has translated books for several publishers, the French Embassy and the Department of Public Education. She received the Translation Development scholarship from the Fondo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes (FONCA) to translate Marcel Proust's first novel, In Search of Lost Time  (Verdehalago, 1999). María received a grant from the French Embassy to complete a degree from the Sorbonne in Paris, one from the Organization of American States (OAS) to study at the University of Geneva in Switzerland and a grant from the Office of the French Book from the French Embassy in Mexico. She has given workshops on translation in Mexico and abroad. She currently coordinates the Academic Group "Linguistics and Translation" at the Universidad Veracruzana, which offers various courses on literary translation and translation pedagogy for students and professors, manages translation theses and conducts research on Translation Pedagogy. 

 

Mariana De la Vega

Mariana de la Vega V. is a the Co-Director of the ATA Group of English to Spanish Editors and an expert translator for the Tribunal Superior de Justicia del Distrito Federal (TSJDF). She is also a professor for the Escuela NAcional de Lenguas, Lingüística y Traducción (ENALLT) Department of Translation and Interpretation (previously CELE) at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). Mariana teaches Judicial Transaltion, Social Science Text Translation and Translation Techniques, among others. She is a lawyer for the Autonomous Technical Institute of Mexico (ITAM). She has a law degree from UNAM and has taken coursework about the US judicial system from Harvard University. 

 

Mike Lotito

Mike’s experience includes both corporate C-Suite and entrepreneurial ventures in the American advertising industry. He is currently a Founding Partner of VFL Capital, an angel investment firm focused on the Marketing vertical. Previously, he was founder and Chief Executive Officer of Media IQ, a New York based media audit firm specializing in evaluating ad buying efficiency for advertisers and their agencies. The company was purchased by Procurian in 2012, and then subsequently purchased by Accenture in December 2013. Before becoming a successful start-up entrepreneur, he held a wide variety of Ad Agency positions. He capped off his advertising career as President and COO of Initiative Media North America, a $7 Billion media agency with 1200 employees in 15 offices throughout the United States.

In 2015, Mike taught an adult education course in Entrepreneurship for the Queens Economic Development Corporation (QEDC) and is currently teaching a course to underprivileged young adults in Mexico designed to help them create a personal narrative and resume so they can apply for jobs in the tourism sector. Mike has been Co-Chair of the Annual National Multiple Sclerosis Golf Outing for 30 years. This preeminent advertising industry event has raised over $7 million to fight this devastating disease. In addition, he serves on the organizing committee of ‘A Celebration of Life New York’ which raises funds to support suicide prevention in middle schools and high schools. Mike is also a founding Board Member of Hands Offering Hope, which exists to provide young men and women with the chance to thrive through a global network of experts.

 

Mercedes Guhl

Mercedes Gulh is a translator, editor and university professor. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree on Philosophy and Literature from the Andes University (Colombia) and a Master’s Degree in Translation Studies from Warwick University. She started working as a children’s and youth books editor in Editorial Norma, where she was also corrector of literary translations. She is member of the Mexican Translators Organization (OMT) and the American Translators’ Association (ATA) for which she has hold several workshops and seminars in different countries. Besides being a translator, editor and professor, she has published a number of reviews and literary critics in specialized magazines such as Ikala and Forma y Función.

 

Miguel Ángel Martínez Martínez

 Born in 1940, Miguel Ángel Martínez Martínez began his political career in the 1950s as activist in the student resistance movement against the fascist dictatorship in his native country Spain. As a leader of the Student Socialists of Spain, he was arrested, tortured, prosecuted, sentenced and jailed by the totalitarian authorities in Madrid. Later, he managed to escape and lived in exile for 14 years in France, Austria and Belgium.

During this decade and a half, Miguel Ángel Martínez was able to continue his studies in linguistics in support of the International Union of Workers and Students and international and Europen organizations, as well as work for institutions such as the European Council or the International Labor Organization to support human rights, unions and youth. 

Miguel Ángel Martínez returned to Madris in 1976 and worked in the reorganization of the new General Union of Workers (UGT) and the Spanish Socialist Workers' Union (PSOE). In 1977, he was elected member of the Spanish Congress in the first elections held in Spain since 1936. Martínez was elected six times, and remained an active member of parliament until he applied for the European Parliament in 1999. He also has a long history of participating in European and international issues such as serving as a member of: the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, which he led from 1992, 1996; the Western European Union, of which he was vice president from 1986 to 1996; and of the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU), of which he was vice president and then president from 1997-1999.

As a member of the European Parliament, Miguel Ángel Martínez has been actively involved in the issue of multilingualism, the European Union's expansion process and collaborating in the Third World development. In 2007, as vicepresidente European Parliament (he was re-elected in 2009 and 20011), his primary duties involved relationships between national parliaments of member states and with candidate countries of the European Union. 

Miguel Ángel Martínez studied in Madrid, Toulouse and Vienna. He has by decorated by more than 30 countries from every continent, including 21 European Union member states and several universities, such as Comenius Medal from the University of Bratislava and the Honoris Causa Doctorate by the Universities of Aberdeen, Cluj and Moscow. He was named the Honorary President of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe and the Inter-Parliamentary Union.

 

Salomé Abud-Krafft

Originally from Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico, Salomé Abud-Krafft is a conference interpreter with a degree from the Instituto Superior de Intérpretes y Traductores. In 1997, after passing the UN exam and competitive selection process, she became a United Nations interpreter. Currently, Salomé is one of only two Mexican interpreters and serves as chief interpreter for the United Nations simultaneous interpreting service in New York. She is in charge of quality assurance for the interpretation into Spanish for UN conferences and meetings. She is responsible for 18 permanent staff interpreters and oversees independent contract interpreters who are hired to cover the Spanish booth for specific activities. In 2016, as part of an exchange program between the European Union and the United Nations, Salomé worked as an interpreter for the European Parliament. That same year she was also named as a Board Advisor to the Italia Morayta Foundation through 2021.

 

Sergio García Ramírez

A former judge at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, Sergio García Ramírez presided over this international court from 2004-2007. Born in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, he studied at the National Autonomous University of Mexico’s (UNAM) Law School. He received his law degree with honors in 1963 and his doctorate in 1971 with Magna Cum Laude, the first time this distinction had ever been conferred for a UNAM PhD in Law. He is a lead researcher for the Institute of Judicial Research and an Associate Professor at the UNAM’s Law School. Sergio is also a National Researcher for the National System of Researchers. In 1993 he was elected member of the UNAM’s Government Council. He is a director of the Revista de la Facultad de Derecho (the UNAM Law School’s Journal). Sergio is a director for the Centro Universitario México’s Division of Higher Education. He was president and founder of the Governing Council for the National Institute of Criminal Science. 

 

Virginia Aguirre Muñoz

Virginia Aguirre Muñoz is a graduate of the Translator Training Program at the Colegio de México and of the BA in Translation from the Instituto Superior de Intérpretes y Traductores. With over ten books and dozens of articles translated, which have been published by the Cultural Economic Fund, the National Autonomous University of Mexico, the National Institute of Statistics and Geography, Instituto and UNESCO, as well as by leading Spanish-language magazines like Este País and Nexos. She has worked at varoius international conferences and similar events as a translator for entities such as the Organization of American States and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Since 2014, she joined the team of Spanish translators at the headquarters of an international body in Washington, D.C. She is also a member of the Mexican College of Conference Interpreters, A.C.

 

Ximena Gutiérrez Vasques

Ximena is a computer engineer for the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) with a Masters in Computer Science with a linguistic computation focus from the Carolina University, Czech Republica and the Bozen-Bolzano University in Italy. Currently, she is a doctoral candidate in the UNAM Linguistic Engineering Group, which develops language technology for the indigenous language Náhuatl.

 

Lenguas Sponsorship Opportunities

Lenguas is the first conference in Mexico to gather stakeholders from all language professions Lenguas provides an exclusive opportunity for your company’s representatives to interact, face-to-face, with 250 attendees who:

  • Are professional interpreters, translators, leaders, experts, project managers, trainers, company owners, educators, advocates and end users in Mexico.

  • Come from the indigenous community, conference, and sign language interpreting specializations.

  • Come from the translation specializations of literature, localization and everything in between.

 

Lenguas is the first conference in Mexico to share the results of the only market research survey on the state of translation and interpreting in Mexico. A White Paper will be presented that summarizes the results of the 1st National Survey on Translation and Interpretation in Mexico, conducted in 2017.

A unique mix of plenary, educational and networking sessions promotes extensive interaction between attendees and sponsors /exhibitors. At Lenguas, the typical barriers between sponsors and attendees are broken down. Lenguas will help you to:

  • form lasting relationships with key contacts;

  • introduce your services and products to new customers; and

  • become part of a growing professional community of advocates who have direct

  • influence over purchasing your products and services.

 

Prominent Website and Social Media Promotion
As a sponsoring company you will receive extensive promotion on the Lenguas event website. Your company description, logo and URL will be prominently displayed throughout the year. Your support will also be publicized via our social media presence on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, professional listserves and the InterpretAmerica blog. 

Opportunity to Show Leadership
Lenguas is a strong advocate for the translation and interpreting professions. Your sponsorship signals to the entire field that you play a leading role in strengthening and promoting this growth profession.

 

Exclusive Sponsorship Information

All Exclusive Sponsorships include promotion on the Lenguas website, social media platforms and special signage displayed in the conference venue.

 

  • WiFi for Conference Attendees - $2000 USD:  Our goal is to provide high-speed WiFi access to all sponsors and attendees.

  • Conference bag - $500 USD:  Your company’s logo will be prominently displayed on the conference bag provided to all         attendees.

  • Lanyard Sponsor - $500 USD:  Your company’s logo will be prominently displayed on name badge lanyards provided to all   attendees.

  • Welcome Reception Sponsor - $5000 USD (2 available):  Special recognition will be given at the reception, both verbally and with signage displayed  during the event, plus presentation time for your company to event attendees.

  • Day 1 Networking Lunch Sponsor - $3000 USD:  Special recognition will be given prior to the lunch both verbally and with signage displayed during lunch.

  • Coffee Break Sponsor - $2750 USD (all three days):  Special recognition will be given to attendees verbally and with signage displayed at coffee break sites.

  • Display Advertising in the Lenguas 2017 Conference Program: Every attendee receives a copy of the Lenguas 2017 Conference Program. Maximize your exposure by taking out an ad!

    • 1/4 page:       $250 USD

    • 1/2 page:       $300 USD

    • Full page:      $400 USD

    • Inside front cover:  $500 USD

    • Back cover:    $600 USD

 

DIAMOND - $3500 USD

Diamond Sponsors will receive special recognition on the Lenguas.org website as primary benefactor of a more united interpreting profession in Mexico.

  • Top Placement in the Exhibitor Hall

  • Presentation Opportunity at Pre-Conference Welcome and Networking Session

  • 2 full conference passes

  • Logo, company description and URL in Conference Program and on website

  • Full-page advertisement in Conference Program

  • Special verbal recognition and signage display throughout conference venue

   

PLATINUM - $2500 USD

  • 2 full conference passes

  • Preferential Placement in the Exhibitor Hall

  • Logo, company description and URL in Conference Program and on website

  • Half page advertisement in Conference Program

  • Signage display throughout conference venue

 

GOLD - $2000 USD

  • 1 full conference pass

  • Display in Exhibitor Hall

  • Logo, company description and URL in Conference Program and on website

  • Quarter page ad in Conference Program

  • Signage display throughout conference venue

 

EXHIBITOR SPACE - $1000 USD

  • 1 full conference pass

  • 1 conference bag stuffer

  • Logo, company description and URL in Conference Program and on website

  • Table display in registration hall

 

EXHIBITOR WORKSHOP - $1000 USD

  • 1.5 hour presentation/demo to 20 conference participants with box lunch

  • 1 full conference pass

  • Logo, company description and URL in Conference Program and on website

 

EXHIBITOR SPACE + 1 WORKSHOP - $1500 USD

EXHIBITOR SPACE + 2 WORKSHOPS - $2000 USD

INSTITUTION - $600 USD

This category is for professional associations, non-profits and educational institutions only.

  • 1 full conference pass

  • Logo, company description and URL in Conference Program and on website

  • Table display in registration hall

 

Lenguas Venue

It’s hard to overstate the beauty and majesty of the Lenguas venue, El Antiguo Colegio de San Ildelfonso in the heart of downtown Mexico City. San Ildelfonso is a working art museum that is the birthplace of the Mexican muralist movement. The beauty of the plenary hall alone will be worth the price of attendance. You will be displaying your company, product or institution in a setting designed to inspire.

 

Lenguas Venue

 

El Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso 

ADDRESS: Justo Sierra 16, Centro Histórico de la Ciudad de México, CP. 06020

EMAIL: informes@sanildefonso.org.mx

The Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso is a working art museum and renowned cultural center, located just steps off the famous Zocaló plaza in downtown Mexico City, a UNESCO world heritage site. The walk to the venue is both pleasent and safe. It is considered the birthplace of the Mexican muralism movement. The museum has permanent and temporary art and archeological exhibitions in addition to the many murals painted on its walls by José Clemente Orozco, Fernando Leal, Diego Rivera and others. The museum is located between San Ildefonso Street and Justo Sierra Street in the historic center of Mexico City.

 

Conference Hotel

We have secured a great conference rate at two hotels right on the famous Zocalo Plaza in the heart of Mexico City.

Zocalo Central

Zocalo Central Hotel is set in a metropolitan area of Mexico City next to the Edificio de Correos and Museo Nacional de San Carlos. The traditional hotel in Mexico City attracts guests with its colonial architecture.

 

Histórico Central

This downtown hotel is housed in an ornate 18th-century property and is within an 11-minute walk of both Mexico City Metropolitan Cathedral and the Palacio de Bellas Artes.

Both hotels can be viewed at:

http://www.centralhoteles.com/

 

Rate: We have secured a special $100/night rate (around $100 according to the exchange rate) for the Lenguas conference, which includes tax and breakfast.

 **Mention the "Lenguas Forum" when making your reservation to get the conference rate.

 If you don’t want to stay at the conference hotel, there are many other lodging options available in the area. Visit TripAdvisor’s hotel suggestions for the Centro Histórico  or Historic Downtown in Mexico City to find the right lodging option for you.

Lenguas Travel Information

Lenguas 2017 will be held at the beautiful Colegio de San Ildefonso in historic downtown Mexico City. The conference has secured discounted room blocks at two nearby hotels, the Zócalo Hotel and the Histórico Central. Detailed information about the conference venue and hotels can be found here. 

 

By Plane

You have two options for flying into Mexico City, the Benito Jaurez International Airport and the Toluca Licenciado Adolfo López Mateos International Airport (TLC). 

Benito Jaurez International Airport 

Mexico City's Benito Juárez International Airport takes in flights from all over the world. International flights depart from the newer Terminal 2 and from the international section of Terminal 1; domestic flights are accommodated by the rest of Terminal 1.

Toluca's Licenciado Adolfo López Mateos International Airport (TLC) 

(Excerpted from Frommers.com.)  The TLC lies just 52km (32 miles) southwest of Benito Juárez International Airport and has been a convenient alternative for Mexican nationals since it opened in 2002. In 2006 the airport started accommodating a limited amount of international traffic and now Continental (tel. 800/523-3273 in the U.S., or 01-800/900-5000 in Mexico), United (tel. 800/538-2929 in the U.S., 01-800/003-0777 in Mexico), and the Mexican airline Volaris (tel. 866/988-3527 in the U.S., or 01-800/122-8000 in Mexico) offer regular flights from the U.S. Volaris also offers a shuttle service that takes its customers to the Santa Fe financial district. Domestic flights to and from Toluca are often significantly cheaper than comparable flights through Benito Juárez.

 

By Taxi

(Excerpted from Frommers.com.)  Ignore those who approach you in the arrivals hall offering taxis; they are usually unlicensed and unauthorized. Authorized airport taxis, however, provide good, fast service. After exiting the baggage-claim area and before entering the public concourse (as well as near the far end of the terminal near Gate A), you'll see a booth marked TAXI. Staff members at these authorized taxi booths wear bright-yellow jackets or bibs emblazoned with TAXI AUTORIZADO (authorized taxi). Tell the ticket seller your hotel or destination; the price is based on a zone system. Expect to pay around 300 pesos for a boleto (ticket) to Polanco. Present your ticket outside to the driver. Taxi "assistants" who lift your luggage into the waiting taxi expect a tip for their trouble. Putting your luggage in the taxi is the driver's job.

 

By Bus

(Excerpted from Frommers.com.) Mexico City has a bus terminal for each of the four points of the compass: north, east, south, and west. However, you can't necessarily tell which terminal serves which area of the country by looking at a map.

Some buses leave directly from the Benito Juárez airport. Departures are from a booth located outside Sala D (Gate D), and buses also park there. Tickets to Cuernavaca and Puebla each run about 200 pesos, with departures every 45 minutes. Other destinations include Querétaro, Pátzcuaro, and Toluca.

If you're in doubt about which station serves your destination, ask any taxi driver. Each station has a taxi system based on fixed-price tickets to various zones within the city, operated from a booth or kiosk in or near the entry foyer of the terminal. Locate your destination on a zone map or tell the seller where you want to go, and buy a boleto.

Terminal Central de Autobuses del Norte 

Called "Terminal Norte," or "Central Norte," Avenida de los Cien (100) Metros (tel. 55/5133-2444 or 55/5587-1552), this is Mexico's largest bus station. It handles most buses coming from the U.S.-Mexico border. It also handles service to and from the Pacific Coast as far south as Puerto Vallarta and Manzanillo; the Gulf Coast as far south as Tampico and Veracruz; and such cities as Guadalajara, San Luis Potosí, Durango, Zacatecas, Morelia, and Colima. You can also get to the pyramids of Teotihuacán and Tula from here. By calling the above number, you can purchase tickets over the phone by charging them to a credit card. The operators can also provide exact information about prices and schedules, but few speak English.

To get downtown from the Terminal Norte, you have a choice: The Metro has a station (Terminal de Autobuses del Norte, or TAN) right here, so it's easy to hop a train and connect to all points. Walk to the center of the terminal, go out the front door and down the steps, and go to the Metro station. This is Línea 5 (Line 5). Follow the signs that say DIRECCION PANTITLAN. For downtown, you can change trains at La Raza or Consulado. Be aware that if you change at La Raza, you'll have to walk for 10 to 15 minutes and will encounter stairs. The walk is through a marble-lined underground corridor, but it's a long way with heavy luggage. If you have heavy luggage, you most likely won't be allowed into the Metro in the first place.

Another way to get downtown is by trolleybus. The stop is on Avenida de los Cien Metros, in front of the terminal. The trolleybus runs down Avenida Lázaro Cárdenas, the Eje Central (Central Artery). Or try the Central Camionera Del Norte-Villa Olimpica buses, which go down Avenida Insurgentes, past the university. Just like the Metro, the trolley will not let you board if you are carrying anything larger than a small carry-on suitcase. Backpacks seem to be an exception, but not large ones with frames.

 

Terminal de Autobuses de Pasajeros de Oriente 

This terminal is known as TAPO (tel. 55/5786-9341). Buses going east (Puebla, Amecameca, the Yucatán Peninsula, Veracruz, Xalapa, San Cristóbal de las Casas, and others) and Oaxaca buses, which pass through Puebla, arrive and depart from here.

 

To get to TAPO, take a Hipodromo-Pantitlán bus east along Alvarado, Hidalgo, or Donceles; if you take the Metro, go to the San Lázaro station on the eastern portion of Line 1 (DIRECCION PANTITL&AACUTE;N).

Terminal Central de Autobuses del Sur (Taxqueña) 

 

Mexico City's southern bus terminal is at Av. Taxqueña 1320 (tel. 55/5689-4987), right next to the Taxqueña Metro stop, the last stop on Line 2. The Central del Sur handles buses to and from Acapulco, Cuernavaca, Guadalajara, Huatulco, Puebla, Puerto Escondido, Taxco, Tepoztlán, Zihuatanejo, and intermediate points. The easiest way to get to or from the Central del Sur is on the Metro. To get downtown from the Taxqueña Metro station, look for signs that say DIRECCION CUATRO CAMINOS, or take a trolley bus on Avenida Lázaro Cárdenas.

 

Terminal Poniente de Autobuses 

The western bus terminal is conveniently located right next to the Observatorio Metro station, at Sur 122 and Tacubaya (tel. 55/5271-4519). This is the smallest terminal; it mainly serves the route between Mexico City and Toluca. It also handles buses to and from Ixtapan de la Sal, Valle de Bravo, Morelia, Uruapan, Querétaro, Colima, Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo, Acapulco, and Guadalajara. In general, if the Terminal Norte also serves your destination, you'd be better off going there. It has more buses and better bus lines.

 

Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.

 

By Subway

(Excerpted from Frommers.com.) The Metro, Mexico City's modern subway system, is cheap and faster than a taxi, but it seems to be gaining popularity among thieves who target tourists. If you take it from the airport, be forewarned: As a new arrival, you'll stand out. If you are carrying anything much larger than a briefcase, including a suitcase, don't even bother going to the station -- they won't let you on with it.

To find the Metro at the airport, as you come from your plane into the arrivals hall, turn left toward Gate A and walk through the long terminal, out the doors, and along a covered sidewalk. Soon you'll see the distinctive Metro logo that identifies the Terminal Aérea station, down a flight of stairs. The station is on Metro Línea 5 (Line 5). Follow the signs for trains to Pantitlán. At Pantitlán, change for Line 1 ("Observatorio"), which takes you to stations that are a few blocks south of the Zócalo and La Alameda park: Pino Suárez, Isabel la Católica, Salto del Agua, and Balderas.

This Youtube video (in Spanish) provides a good visual explanation of how to take this route.

By Car

(Excerpted from Frommers.com.) Driving in Mexico City is as much a challenge and an adventure as driving in any major metropolis. Here are a few tips. First, ask the rental company whether your license-plate number permits you to drive in the city that day (break the rule and the fine can be well over 10,000 pesos). Traffic runs the course of the usual rush hours -- to avoid getting tangled in traffic, plan to travel before dawn. Park the car in a guarded lot whenever possible.

The chief thoroughfares for getting out of the city are Insurgentes Sur, which becomes Hwy. 95 to Taxco and Cuernavaca; Insurgentes Norte, which leads to Teotihuacán and Pachuca; Hwy. 57, the Periférico (loop around the city), which is also known as Bulevar Manuel Avila Camacho, to denote street addresses, and goes north and leads out of the city to Tula and Querétaro; Constituyentes, which leads west out of the city past Chapultepec Park and connects with Hwy. 15 to Toluca, Morelia, and Pátzcuaro (Reforma also connects with Hwy. 15); and Zaragoza, which leads east to Hwy. 150 to Puebla and Veracruz.

 

For an alternative source of detailed information about flying into the Benito Juarez International Airport, read TripAdvisor's summary of travel to Mexico City. 

 

Registration

LENGUAS HAS BEEN APPROVED FOR CEUS FOR THE FOLLOWING:

  • CIMCE: Multiple sessions have been approved. Click HERE for the complete list. 

  • ATA: 10 CEUs

 

Registration Options

The Lenguas 2017 conference takes place September 28-30th. The conference is structured with one plenary day where all attendees participate in the same sessions and two days of translation and interpretation training workshop options you select. 

Each workshop session block is 2.15 hours long. Most training workshops are one session block long, but some are two session blocks long and two cover all 6 sessions over September 29 and 30. 

The conference pricing includes the plenary day and the individual training workshops that you select. The more workshops you select the bigger an overall discount you will receive.

Students and participants in the Indigenous Interpreting Skills workshop receive a 50% discount on all registration packets. 

Please review the following list carefully before you click on the Registration Button. 

Your registration options include:

  • Plenary day + 1 sessions

  • Plenary day + 2 sessions

  • Plenary day + 3 sessions

  • Plenary day + 4 sessions

  • Plenary day + 5 sessions

  • Plenary day + 6 sessions

Plenary Day (all sessions included in registration) - Thursday, September 28, 2017

  • OPENING KEYNOTE: The Importance of Multilingualism for the Democratic Process, International Understanding and Peace - Miguel Ángel Martínez Martínez

  • PLENARY SESSION: Results of the White Paper on the Survey of Translation and Interpretation in Mexico 2017 - -Gonzalo Celorio-Morayta, Gibran Mena, Laura Vaughn-Holcomb

  • PLENARY PANEL: Where to Now? Nexts Steps for Language Services in Mexico - Moderator, Gonzalo Celorio-Morayta

  • NETWORKING SESSION: How to Market Your Services in 60 seconds or Less - Mike Lotito (in English)

  • CLOSING KEYNOTE: Humanizing Our Profession - Moderator, InterpretAmerica

  • AWARD CEREMONY: Italia Morayta Foundation Awards Ceremony - Sergio García Ramírez

 

Training Day 1 - Friday, September 29, 2017

Two-day (6 session) workshops:

  • Indigenous Interpreting Skills  - Katharine Allen & TBA (6 sessions - runs Friday and Saturday)

  • Consecutive Interpretation Skills Training, Jacolyn Harmer (in English) (6 sessions - runs Friday and Saturday)

Two-session workshops (same day):

  • How to Prepare for the ATA Certification Exam -Mariana de la Vega & Rudolph Heller (2 sessions)

 

One session workshops:

  • Translating Books for Children and Youth: A Creative Act? -Mercedes Guhl (1 session)

  • Legal Interpreting Outside the Courtroom in the U.S. and Mexico - Esther M. Navarro-Hall & María Inés Ojeda Pesquera

  • Feedback and English Retour Lab for Interpreters - Laura Vaughn-Holcomb (in English)

  • Networking Is Easy! - Mike Lotito (in English)

  • Literary Translation Using "El Espía" as a Guide - María del Pilar Ortiz Lovillo

  • Characteristics of Mexican Sign Language Interpretation -Asociación de Intérpretes de Lengua de Señas del Distrito Federal

  • Online Promotion: A Balance Between Creativity and Discipline - Catherine Pizani

  • Beginning Subtitling - Angélica Ramirez

  • The Psychological Impact of Interpreting - Ana Morales Marín

  • The Digital Interpreter™: Tablets and Pens - Esther M. Navarro-Hall

 

Training Day 2 - Saturday, September 30, 2017

Two-day (6 session) workshops:

  • Indigenous Interpreting Skills  - Katharine Allen & TBA (6 sessions - runs Friday and Saturday)

  • Consecutive Interpretation Skills Training, Jacolyn Harmer (in English) (6 sessions - runs Friday and Saturday)

 

Two-session workshops (same day):

  • Introduction to Web Site and Wep Page Localization, (Part 1/2)* - Luis Raúl Fernández Acosta

  • How to Prepare Terminology for a Simultaneous Interpreting Event, (Part 1/2)* - Darinka Mangino

 

One session workshops:

  • About Translation Commentary - Arturo Vázquez Barrón

  • Remote Interpreting Platforms - Barry S. Olsen

  • Introduction to Theatre Texts Translation - Humberto Pérez Mortera

  • Copyright- What interpreters and translators need to know - Christian Thomae

  • 5 bits of advice when translating marketing material - Erika Maria Eyl Newell

  • Translating for an International Organization -Virginia Aguirre Muñoz

  • Preparing for an International Organization's Interpreter Examination - Salomé Abud

  • AXOLOTL: The Náhuatl Translation System - Ximena Gutiérrez Vasques